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What is a wellness examination?


A wellness examination is a routine medical examination of a pet who appears healthy, as opposed to an examination of a pet who is ill. A wellness examination may also be called a 'check-up' or a 'physical examination'. The focus of a wellness examination is the maintenance of optimal health.


How often should my pet have a wellness examination?
The answer to this question depends on your pet’s age and current health status. During early life, wellness exams are recommended monthly, while for the average adult pet, annual wellness examinations are the norm, and semi-annual examinations are recommended for middle aged, senior, and geriatric pets.
Pets age at a faster rate than people. In one calendar year a pet may age the equivalent of four to sixteen years in a human's life. The reason for this dramatic difference is that puppies and kittens reach maturity very quickly and are essentially adolescents or young adults by one year of age; therefore, they are considered to be the equivalent of 15 or 16 years old by their first birthday. During the second year, the rate of aging slows down a little so that your pet will be the equivalent of about 24 or 25 years old by their second birthday. After that, the rate of aging stabilizes.
Your veterinarian is in the best position to recommend how often your pet should have a wellness examination based on its age, lifestyle, and health status.

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December 2020

24th            8.00am - 5.00pm

25th, 26th, 27th, 28th    CLOSED

29th            8.00am - 5.00pm

30th            8.00am - 5.00pm

31st            CLOSED


January 2021

​1st, 2nd,3rd, 4th    CLOSED

​January 5th onward we are open normal hours

Phone 5211457

 

Christmas Cattery

Our cattery is closed from 3pm on 24th of December until the 5th of January 2021

Cattery drop off and collection hours are between 10am to 2pm Monday to Friday and 10am-12pm on Saturdays.

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  • Keep your pet’s vaccinations up to date. Catteries and kennels require that your animal’s vaccinations are current and usually the last inoculation given at least 2 weeks prior to the start date of your pets boarding.
  • High temperatures. Elderly and very young animals and brachycephalic (short snout breeds such us Pugs, French Bulldogs, etc.) are really sensitive to heat. Avoid exercising them in the middle of the day and always provide shade and fresh water.
  • Never leave your dog inside your car. Even with opened windows, the car temperature can cause your pet to suffer from heat shock, a life compromising situation which needs to be managed as an emergency.
  • Chocolate and raisin ingestion. Chocolate, really popular at this time of year, is toxic for animals, same as raisins. Leave them in a secure place and call the clinic on 521-1457 as soon as you find out that they have eaten them. Treatment varies if it was caught within the first hour of ingestion or after, the sooner the safest.
  • Don't leave presents containing chocolates under the Christmas tree, dogs have an acute sense of smell.
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If you are the new owner of a puppy or kitten please click on the links below to read many of the recommendations from our vets to make sure that you have a happy healthy new pet.

For puppies:

https://kohivet.co.nz/news/posts/2020/information-for-new-puppy-or-kitten-owners/puppies-first-year/

For kittens:

https://kohivet.co.nz/news/posts/2020/information-for-new-puppy-or-kitten-owners/kittens-first-year/

When to desex your dog?
Not only does desexing your animal help in controlling the national population and stop your dog wandering, if done at the right time it also has some health benefits as well. Studies have shown that both male and female dogs who are not desexed or desexed later in life have a higher chance of getting various diseases as they get older, such as cancer. On the other side, if desexed too young a puppy’s growth can be impacted resulting in joint and bone problems later in life. We have created a flow chart that to help us understand the best time to give your pet the best chance in life.

https://kohivet.co.nz/media/1250/desexing-flow-chart.pdf

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PUPPIES:  RECOMMENDATIONS FOR NEW OWNERS

 

We would like to congratulate you on the acquisition of your new puppy. Owning a dog can be an extremely rewarding experience, but it is also a large responsibility. We hope this handout will give you the information needed to make some good decisions regarding your puppy.

 

First, let us say that we are grateful that you have chosen us to help you with your puppy's health care. If you have questions concerning any subject related to your puppy's health, please feel free to call our clinic. Our entire professional staff is willing and happy to help you.

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Kittens first year

Owning a kitten brings its own special rewards and responsibilities, your kitten will be a member of your family for many years so it is worth considering how you will provide for the kittens/cat’s needs.

These needs include

  • A suitable environment to live
  • A suitable diet
  • To exhibit normal behaviour patterns
  • To be housed with or apart from other animals if applicable
  • To be protected from pain, suffering, injury and disease.
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Desexing Flow Chart

When to desex your dog?

Not only does desexing your animal help in controlling the national population and stop your dog wandering, if done at the right time is also has some health benefits as well. Studies have shown that both male and female dogs who are not desexed or desexed later in life have a higher chance of getting various diseases as they get older such as cancer. On the other side, if desexed too young a puppy’s growth can be impacted resulting in joint and bone problems later in life. We have created a flow chart that has found the ideal balance in age for desexing to give your pet the best chance in life.

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Does your cat's bad breath keep the two of you from snuggling? Do you wish you could give your dog a breath mint? Contrary to popular belief, "doggy breath" is not normal. In fact, it could be one of the first signs that your furry pal is developing dental disease.

What is dental disease?

1. Dental disease begins early in life. By the age of three, most dogs and cats have some degree of dental disease. The early signs of dental disease in pets include bad breath, yellow tartar buildup on the teeth, and red and swollen gums. If left untreated, it will progress to cause chronic pain and inflammation. We recommend dental evaluations as part of your pet's regular preventive care exam, which should take place at least once a year.

2. Dental disease causes significant, chronic pain in pets. Animals are experts at hiding signs of pain, so the pain may go unnoticed by you. Instead, you may see that your pet is increasingly irritable and lethargic and has a decresed appetite - changes you may attribute to your pet's advancing age or other lifestyle factors. But after a proper and thorough dental procedure, many pet owners report the emergence of "a whole new pet" - one who is happier and more active.

3. X-rays are essential for diagnosing dental disease. After examining dental radiographs (x-rays) of cat and dogs with teeth that appeared normal to the naked eye, veterinarians found 27.8% of dogs and 41.7% of cats had diseased teeth. In pets with abnormal-looking teeth, veterinarians found additional diseased teeth in 50% of dogs and 53% cats.

4. Anesthesia makes dental evaluation and treatment safer and less stressful for your pet. Animals don't like to hold still while x-rays are taken and sharp instruments are used to clean their teeth. Placing your pet under anesthesia during the procedure allows us to make a more accurate diagnosis and decrease the chance of complications.

5. Anesthesia is much safer than you may think. Before anesthesia, your pet will be carefully screened with bloodwork and during the dental procedure a trained professional will be dedicated to continuously monitoring, recording vital signs, and communicating the findings to the veterinarian.

6. Nonanesthetic dentistry is stressful, unsafe, and ineffective. Without anesthesia it is impossible to obtain x-rays to see what lies beneath your pet's gumline. It is also impossible to safely and effectively clean the teeth using those sharp instruments while the pet is awake.

7. Removing plaque from teeth beneath the gumline is vital. In fact, it's even more important than scaling the portion of the teeth we can see. Bacteria thrive under the gumline, causing infections deep in the tooth root and jaw that can spread throughout the body and affect other organs, such as the heart and kidneys.

8. Your veterinarian will create a personalised pain protocol to keep your pet comfortable.

9. Homecare is an essential part of taking care of your pet's oral health. A variety of products are available and the best choice for your pet can be discussed with out vets.

10. Not all pet dental products are created equal. If you aren't able to brush your pet's teeth as often as you'd like, consider using other dental products designed to help maintain your pet's oral hygiene.

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Dental Diet for Dogs and Cats

Dental care for your pet may be more important than you think. The accumulation of bacteria laden plaque above the gumline can lead to long term oral health issues. Recent studies have demonstrated there is an association between oral health issues and systemic general health issues affecting the kidney, heart and metabolic systems.

Hill's nutritionists & veterinarians developed Hill's Prescription Diet t/d clinical nutrition especially formulated to support your dog's dental health. In fact, t/d is clinically proven nutrition to reduce plaque, stain, & tartar buildup.
How it works:

    Unique kibble shape & size
    Special fibre matrix technology
    Complete & balanced nutrition

How it helps:

    Cleans the tooth surface
    Fights bacteria-laden plaque
    Promotes overall health
    Recommended for lifelong feeding of adult dogs and cats
    S+OXSHIELD: Formulated to promote a urinary environment that reduces the risk of developing struvite & calcium oxalate crystals

Additional info:

Hill's Prescription Diet t/d Canine and Feline is a complete and balanced food that provides all the nutrition your pets needs. Please consult your veterinarian for further information on how Hill's Prescription DietTM foods can help your pet to continue to enjoy a happy and active life.

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FOR APPOINTMENTS CALL 09 521 1457